Pacific Black Duck

The Pacific Black Duck is a dabbling duck which is usually called the Grey Duck in New Zealand. Numbers have decreased in New Zealand because of the introduction of the Mallard which competes for food and also the hybridization of the this duck and Mallard.

Pacific Black Duck

Pacific Black Duck

Appearance: – The Pacific Black Duck has a dark crown, pale head with black facial stripes – one broad eye-stripe and another thinner stripe from the base of the beak, grey beak, brownish-red eyes, the body has dark brown feathers edged in cream, flight feathers are brown, pale under-wing, green speculum, and olive-grey legs and feet. Both sexes are alike but the female is usually smaller and paler.

Size: – Typical Adult is 21-24 inches.

Food: – Aquatic plants, seeds, roots, crustaceans, aquatic insects, molluscs, and invertebrates.

Habitat: – Wetlands, lakes, flooded grasslands, swamps, and lagoons in Indonesia, New Guinea, Australia, New Zealand, and islands in the southwestern Pacific.

Breeding Season: – June to January in the south, and January to April further north.

Eggs: – 7 to 13 (glossy-white color).

Notes: – The Pacific Black Duck is a dabbling duck which is usually called the Grey Duck in New Zealand. Numbers have decreased in New Zealand because of the introduction of the Mallard which competes for food and also the hybridization of the Pacific Black Duck and Mallard.

The different types of wild ducks can be grouped into puddle, aka “dabbling” and diving ducks. The dabblers mostly feed in smaller bodies of shallow water or along shorelines, where they are able to tip their bodies forward to reach their food on the bottom. There are divers who feed in deeper water where they dive and pursue their quarry. Some of these birds, the Harlequin Duck for example, actually dives to the bottom of fast-flowing waters and feeds on life forms attached to rocks.

 

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