Pomeranian Geese

Pomeranian Geese were traditionally bred to have a large amount of breast meat on them. They were used for delicacies like smoked goose breast in their native region of Pomerania in the Northern part of Germany, bordering with Poland. It is probable that the modern Pomeranian Goose does not have the same shape. In Germany, Pomeranian Geese can be found in Grey, Pied Buff, Pied Grey, and White. The Pomeranian Goose has blue eyes and has been specifically bred to have a single-lobed paunch. Dual lobed birds are usually Grey Back Geese. Exhibiting them with a dual lobed paunch will usually result in a disqualification. Some strains of Pomeranian Geese are good layers and can lay up to 70 eggs in a season although most exhibition strains lay half of this amount.

When selecting breeders, look for birds with chunky bodies and well-defined markings. When viewed from behind and above, the colored areas of the backs and shoulders should be reminiscent of the classic heart shape. Solid-colored heads are preferred, but most specimens have white feathers around the base of their bills. Some strains of Pomeranian Geese produce birds with slight indications of knobs at the base of their bills. Guard against this fault since it is evidence of crossbreeding. Avoid breeding specimens with dual lobed paunches, dewlaps, orange bills and feet, excessively white heads, dark feathers in the wings, or undersized bodies.

Pomeranian Geese were standardized in 1982 in the UK. They are called L’Oie de Pomranie in France and Pommeranians in Germany.

Pomeranian Geese

Pomeranian Geese

Uses: Utility – traditionally breast meat. Eggs: 35 to 70 white eggs per year.
Origin:
Germany / Poland.
Weight: Gander: 17-22 lbs. Goose:  15-18 lbs.
Colors: Ganders: White, a little grey. Geese: Light Grey.
Useful to Know: Must have a single lobed paunch.

The ancestors of the domestic goose are derived from two distinct wild species. Western (European) breeds have been developed from the greylag, and Asiatic breeds such as the African and Chinese from the swan goose. Despite their separate origin, the Asiatics and greylag types do inter-breed.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email