Common Poultry Diseases

Below are the most commonly encountered poultry diseases listed in
alphabetical order. Less frequently observed diseases require consultation with
a specialty disease manual. Serious illness is unlikely in a backyard flock, especially if you vaccinate the chickens. That being said, you must always be aware of the diseases in case you ever are wondering, is my chicken sick? Poultry diseases can spread from wild birds and pests, so keep an eye out during your daily health checks for the poultry diseases listed below.

Ascarid
Worms
Aspergillosis
Blackhead
Botulism
Cage Layer Fatigue
Cannibalism
Capillaria
Cecal Worms
Chiggers
Coccidiosis

Erysipelas
E. coli
Fatty Liver Hemorrhagic Syndrome
Fowl Cholera
Fowl Pox
Fowl Typhoid
Gapeworms
Heximitiasis
Infectious Bronchitis
Infectious Bursal Disease
Infectious Coryza
Lice
Lymphoid
Leucosis
Marek’s Disease
Mites
Moniliasis
Mycoplasmas
Mycotoxicosis
Necrotic
Enteritis
Newcastle Disease
Omphalitis
Pullorum
Quail Bronchitis
Tapeworms
Ticks
Ulcerative Enteritis

If a poultry producer is to reap all the benefits from the investment of money, time and labor, he must maintain a healthy and parasite-free flock. The health status of his birds is important to the producer whether he maintains a backyard flock or commercial poultry flock. Constant monitoring of the flock is the first step in detecting poultry diseases. Identification of the cause and appropriate treatment can prevent a minor condition from becoming an unprofitable enterprise.

Nutritious feed, access to fresh, clean water, and  adequate housing are important to the health of your flock. Good management and sanitation practices are essential as well. Proper ventilation in the brooder and coop will reduce moisture and disease organisms. Caked or wet litter should be removed as soon as it forms to keep the house clean and dry.

For most backyard poultry enthusiasts, diseases are rare as long as the flock doesn’t come into contact with other flocks. The most common disease for young, un-medicated flocks is coccidiosis, which is characterized by diarrhea, un-thriftiness and some mortality. A medicated chick feed can help prevent coccidiosis.
A rigid sanitation program can help prevent parasites. If internal parasites become a problem, products to treat them are available from your feed dealer.

Check your flock daily to spot diseases or parasites so you can start treatment right away. For more information about identifying, preventing and treating poultry diseases and parasites, contact your local veterinarian.

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